Another Day, Another Dollar

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Good afternoon! I hope everyone is having a productive Monday.  I’m never particularly cheerful on Mondays, but at least today seems to be going by quickly!

 

Around 9:30, I tried one of the new JamFrakas bars, which is basically Larabar’s answer to my beloved Clif bars (i.e., they are both for kids).

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My opinion? BLETCH! First off all, I realize these for for kiddies, but they are only 90 calories and taste…. strange? unnatural? too sweet? They taste OFF in general.  I’ve got four more flavors to try, so hopefully, I’ll like one. šŸ™‚

 

CLIF BAR, YOU ARE STILL MY #1!

 

For lunch, I had leftover Thai food, which I bulked up with some extra broc.

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The chicken was cooked in this delightfully spicy garlic and pepper sauce.  I’d love to know how they make it!  I always get my Thai food "Thai spicy," which isn’t even on the "American" scale of  1 – 10.  This dish burned my sinuses wide open! Yum!

 

I also had a plum….

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And my first mid-afternoon snack of 1/2 cup plain yogurt, sans granola šŸ™

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Death of the Bake Sale

 

I saw an interesting article on New York Times this morning about new legislation regarding the nutritional value of food served in public schools.

 

"The old-fashioned school bake sale, once as American as apple pie, is fast becoming obsolete in California, a result of strict new state nutrition standards for public schools that regulate the types of food that can be sold to students. The guidelines were passed by lawmakers in 2005 and took effect in July 2007. They require that snacks sold during the school day contain no more than 35 percent sugar by weight and derive no more than 35 percent of their calories from fat and no more than 10 percent of their calories from saturated fat."

 

Students have resorted to selling balloon grams or doing car washes to raise money, as they are no longer to sell baked goods during school hours.

 

What do you think about the new legislation prohibiting unhealthy food in public schools?  I think it’s generally a great idea, but there are intended consequences (like the death of bake sales).  Plus, I find the across-the-board cut of unhealthy foods too strict — it’s not exactly teaching our children to MAKE healthy choices (they are just forced to because there are no other options) and it doesn’t teach them that treats in moderation is OK.

{ 31 comments }

 

  • Tina November 10, 2008, 11:24 am

    I agree– I like the regular Larabars much more. They’re softer and more moist… and overall just taste more natural.

  • Erica November 10, 2008, 11:31 am

    That is a bummer that the bar wasn’t very good…

    Sigh….for some reason the same message keeps floating through my head- when we were kids we ate fun snacks every once in a while and their was not a childhood obesity epidemic. The problem is kids are not active any more, they sit inside and play video games instead of using their imaginations outdoors! We also have lost the everything in moderation concept. The answer is not to eliminate food, the idea is to teach moderation! Whats happening?

  • Meghann November 10, 2008, 11:35 am

    The chocolate pne was good, it had actual chocolate chips in it, but it took a couple of bites to get used to it. I am not a fan of the fruit larabars so I am almost afreaid to try the fruit Jamfrakas.

    It is my belief if you restrict a child on anything, whether it be food or what they should wear, they are more like to rebel. Most of my friends in college who put on the msot weight freshmen year were the ones who lived under their parents strict guidlines of what and when to eat. When they got to school and had no boundaries they went crazy over the never ending supply of junk and cafeteria food. My opinion is that we should be raised to know food can be good in moderation and learn to restrict ourselves on our own terms becuase of it.

  • runjen November 10, 2008, 11:39 am

    Wow, that is interesting about the bake sales. I am kind of torn on the issue. I can definitely be pros and cons to both sides.

    Love that little heart dish, btw. So cute!

  • Erin November 10, 2008, 11:47 am

    Hi Caitlin-
    I’m new to the world of blogging, but I’ve been reading your blog for the past couple of weeks and you really are an inspiration!
    I’ve always been into health and fitness, but I’ve never been all that athletic. I started running about a month ago and reading your blog has really helped me realize I actually CAN learn to run.
    I couldn’t run a mile a month ago and this morning I did three miles without stopping and I’m ecstatic! Thanks so much for sharing your journey.

  • Halie November 10, 2008, 11:51 am

    Too strict – I agree, kids need to be taught how to make good decisions when it comes to food. We hope these kids are being taught that at home – in a balanced way.

    Bummer about the JamFrakas bar, they haven’t made it to my area yet, and it sounds like they probably won’t if they are yucky!

    Glad your Monday is going quick!

  • Caitlin (see bride run) November 10, 2008, 11:52 am

    erin – YAYYYYY CONGRATS on learning to love running! that is so awesome! šŸ™‚ thanks for delurking to say hi, it means a lot.

  • tfh November 10, 2008, 11:56 am

    I just got the chance to read your 10k race report– WOW! That is incredible! I hope you are still feeling so proud of yourself. And how amazing that the knee sleeves have been so helpful. The speed, however, was all you!

    I noticed the school kids around here have all switched from selling candy for fundraising to selling fruit. I think it’s nice but the occasional bake sale is a good treat, too– hopefully by the time we have kids schools will have found a healthy balance!

  • magpie November 10, 2008, 12:08 pm

    I think that’s kind of sad about the bake sales. I honestly don’t think that schools can contribute much to keeping a kid from gaining weight – if they want to eat crap, they’re going to eat it at home. Let them sell cookies! I do approve of healthy school lunches though.

  • Balance, Joy and Delicias! November 10, 2008, 12:25 pm

    agree with regulation. Good habits should be incorporated sooner than later.

  • VeggieGirl November 10, 2008, 12:25 pm

    REGULAR LARABARS REIGN SUPREME!!! šŸ˜€

    Bake sales used to be so fun!! Too bad, I say – they should ban the horrid cafeteria foods first, making those healthier!!

  • Leah November 10, 2008, 12:28 pm

    I tried the honey graham z-bar today and I LOVED it! I wish I had more of them! I will have to stock up at Christmas! What’s your fav Z-BAR flavour??

  • Tami November 10, 2008, 12:31 pm

    and they can’t be latex balloons either, the more expensive mylar ones! my daughter is in preschool and there are two kids allergic to carrots and one with peanut/tree nut-we have to check all our labels…one type of granola bar has tree nut traces in it….i agree with erica, moderation not elimination

  • Marissa November 10, 2008, 12:34 pm

    I really think it has to do with lack of activity. Kids have the internet, video games, texting, etc. and aren’t outside doing physical activities.

  • Andrea (Off Her Cork) November 10, 2008, 1:06 pm

    The last time we had Chinese, when I ate leftovers I put them on top of romaine and spinach and LOVED it! I’m doing that from now on, no more rice for me.

    My husband is Thai and he’s always asking for things to be extra spicy and they are never spicy enough for him. My mouth will be burning and he’ll say, “Eh, I guess it has some spice.” LOL

  • ashley (sweet and natural) November 10, 2008, 1:12 pm

    My elementary school actually stopped having bake sales when I was in 7th grade or so, but at that time, it was all for fear of allergic reactions or people selling contaminated goodies. Sad, b/c I remembered them being so fun, but there are lots of other ways to raise money for a school.

  • Shauna November 10, 2008, 2:11 pm

    Last year, when the law went into effect, I was in my senior year of high school and I saw healthier alternatives enter vending machines and the school cafeteria eliminated some of its unhealthy options. I agree that they should be focusing on teaching kids to choose healthier options and I wonder if that will ever be addressed. But at least this is a step in the right direction. And I’m glad my school stopped serving some of the most disgusting (I can’t say for sure because I was a hardcore brownbagger, but they certainly looked it) foods–like for breakfast, sometimes they’d serve a sausage, dipped and fried in pancake batter, on a stick, along with a little pouch of maple syrup for dipping. *shudder*

    Your lunch looks delicious!

    And congrats to Erin, who commented about being able to run three miles! I’m also new to running and I’m almost at that point. Today might be the day šŸ™‚ You’re definitely an inspiration, Caitlin!

  • Runeatrepeat November 10, 2008, 2:38 pm

    Yeah, I don’t think the ban of sweets is the answer. My mom is a teacher and her school did not allow sweets on halloween, but they were selling nachos! Ummm, maybe they didn’t get the transfat memo. I just seemed so hypocritical. And the cafeteria serves peperoni pizza EVERY Wednesday, that is not mentioning all the other crap they serve. Really? We need to teach kids how to make healthy choices.

  • Bridget November 10, 2008, 2:42 pm

    I think a strict change like that is only going to go so far for kids in school. I was heavier in high school and what I ate at school wasnt nearly as much of a problem as what I ate when I got home. I would just snack SO much, I was consuming way too many calories. I think having the healthy options is great, but they need education and physical activity!

  • Aggie November 10, 2008, 2:43 pm

    I heard about the death of the bake sale on Sirius today…it is a bit sad. It’s a shame that food has become such an “issue” for schools. It is very different nowadays. I agree with Erica that kids aren’t as active as they used to be.

    On another note, too bad about that bar! I’m a new fan of both Clif and Larabars, though skeptical at first I do love them for pre/post workout snacks!

    Your Thai looks good…and I LOVE mine spicy too! (Though not sure if I’ve ever had “Thai spicy”!!)

  • Aggie November 10, 2008, 2:46 pm

    I just read Veggie Girls comment…I was thinking the same thing!! Shouldn’t they be a bit more concerned about what they are feeding the kids everyday (fried, fatty foods) vs the occasional bake sale??

  • Caitlin (see bride run) November 10, 2008, 2:50 pm

    everyone’s comments are very insightful!

    veggie girl and aggie – the laws apply to both regular cafeteria food and stuff sold in the vending machines, as well as “special event” food.

  • Mrs. LC November 10, 2008, 2:57 pm

    Dang girl, you like your food SPICY!!!

    I have mixed feelings about the bake sale thing. I do think it is good that at least they are trying to do something, but I completely agree with the reader who commented that we need to instead teach moderation. That’s really teaching kids how to succeed nutritionally, and in many other areas too.

    The other point about bake sales is that they’re not always a good “health” idea on a different level. When I was in elementary school (younger years) there was a bake sale, I bought a cookie that had a tree nut, and being deathly allergic, I started to have a reaction. Except that I was so young I didn’t realize it and thought I was just getting sick and sleepy. Fortunately another teacher saw the cookie, remembered a girl in my classroom had an allergy, and I made it to the nurse to get my epi pen. I have heard of similar stories, especially with students with peanut allergies. Anyway, just another angle to bake sales. šŸ™‚

  • Elina November 10, 2008, 3:01 pm

    It seems that noone in the blog world likes those new larabars. Didn’t they try them before selling them? šŸ™‚

    I think banning unhealthy foods is a good idea in general, but I think bake sales should still be allowed. This way it’s like a special treat, and kids won’t be exposed to the junk on everyday basis. I think it’s a tough thing to teach kids about moderation (especially in school) so eliminating the temptation is a good idea. They can have their junk (in moderation) outside of school, where hopefully their parents teach them just that.

  • BOBBI McCORMICK November 10, 2008, 3:24 pm

    I agree! Yes cutting out most of the junk is a good idea, but bake sales sad day:( We have healthy bake sales at our school!

  • seeleelive (for the love of peanut butter) November 10, 2008, 3:49 pm

    I have to agree with Bobbi and the majority of the people-kids are the sponges. If they are prohibited to have BAKESALES–what lesson is that teaching them? They need to check out all our blogs for healthy treats!

  • Katie November 10, 2008, 4:10 pm

    Nutritionally, sure bake sales aren’t great, but everything in moderation! And just because schools hold the occasional bake sale doesn’t mean childhood obesity is going to get even worse than it already is. But yeah, I get it…

    The weekend after September 11 my friends and I had a bake sale on broadway (in New York) and raised $1300. They’re great for charity, and people always stop by.

  • Claire November 10, 2008, 4:35 pm

    I’m not a fan of Lara bars to start with…however, I did like the strawberry JamFrakas bar! The Clif bars are definitely better and I really like the Mojo bars.

    As to the bake sales, I think that limiting DAILY snacks is great, but there should be some way to have treats in there…the occasional party or bake sale.

  • Simple and Divine November 10, 2008, 7:15 pm

    I DON’T LIKE LARABARS AT ALL, but loved the apple jamfrakas bar! I have yet to try the other ones, but the apple one is definitely yummy šŸ™‚ Not too sweet and very natural tasting! OH! And the pb one? YUM!!! And I don’t even love peanut butter, tho this may make me a little more curious hehe

  • Tim Rosanelli November 11, 2008, 8:26 am

    Beautiful Plating of the food!

    As for the legislation, I think it’s good. I was total surprised to find out that my High School has Soda Machines in the cafeteria.

    It amazed me. The problem is that by having it in the school that message you give to kids is that it’s okay and healthful way to eat.

    Tim Rosanelli
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  • Jordan November 11, 2008, 8:06 pm

    I need some Thai now, thanks =P

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